The Learning Value of Game Design Activities: Association between Computational Thinking and Cognitive Skills

Bernadette Spieler
bernadette.spieler@imai.unihildesheim. de
Institute of Mathematics and Applied Informatics, University of Hildesheim

Ferenc Kemény, Karin Landerl, Bernd Binder
ferenc.kemeny@uni-graz.at
karin.landerl@uni-graz.at
bernd.binder@uni-graz.at
Institute of Psychology, University of Graz

Wolfgang Slany
wolfgang.slany@tu-graz.at
Institute of Software Technology, Graz University of Technology

Continue reading “The Learning Value of Game Design Activities: Association between Computational Thinking and Cognitive Skills”

Design, Code, Stitch, Wear, and Show It! Mobile Visual Pattern Design in School Contexts

Bernadette Spieler Instiute of Mathematics and Applied Informatics University of Hildesheim Hildesheim, Germany bernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de
Vesna Krnjic Institute for Software Technology Graz University of Technology) Graz, Austria vesna.krnjic@ist.tugraz.at
Wolfgang Slany Institute for Software Technology Graz University of Technology) Graz, Austria wolfgang.slany@tugraz.at
Karin Horneck bits4kids OG Graz, Austria karin.horneck@bits4kids.at
Ute Neudorfer bits4kids OG Graz, Austria ute.neudorfer@bits4kids.at

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The hAPPy-Lab: A Gender-Conscious Way To Learn Coding Basics in an Open Makerspace Setting

Bernadette Spieler [0000−0003−2738−019X] , University of Hildesheim, Universit¨asplatz 1, 31141 Hildesheim, Germany , Maria Grandl [0000−0002−4869−9725] and Vesna Krnjic [0000−0001−9555−4556)] Graz University of Technology, Rechbauerstr. 12, 8010 Graz, Austria

Abstract. In Computer Science, and particularly in the context of Maker Education, students should try out new technologies (including coding) or craft techniques without fear of failure and in a playful way. Studies have shown that learning programming through tinkering appeals to boys more than girls. Taking that into consideration, tools and tasks can make a huge difference in an open learning and teaching environment. These observations are supported by the results of a pop-up-makerspace event for children and teenagers between the ages of 10 and 14. The “MAKER DAYS” for kids took place in the summer of 2019 at Graz University of Technology and attracted 132 children for 4 days. The main goal of the event was to enable authentic learning experiences and to try out new technologies. Participants could choose from a variety of activities, including digital fabrication with 3D-printing, soldering, programmed embroidery, coding, and robotics. Five workshop areas focused on coding skills. The “hAPPy-Lab” acted as a starting point to practise Computational Thinking as well as to learn the basics of coding by developing an app. For example, participants with minor or no coding skills, who wanted to create an embroidery design or use a microcontroller, were asked to visit the hAPPy-Lab first. The hAPPy-Lab implemented a carousel activity and the participants were supported by peer tutors. In this paper, we present the didactic and educational environment of the hAPPy-Lab and suggestions for a similar environment in school.

Keywords: Open Learning Spaces · Maker Space · Girls · Creative Co

Conference: ISSEP 2020: https://issep2020.tlu.ee/
International Conference on Informatics in School:
Situation, Evaluation and Perspectives 2020

Cite as: Spieler, B.; Grandl, M.; and Krnjic, V. (2020). The hAPPy-Lab: A Gender-Conscious Way To Learn Coding Basics in an Open Makerspace Setting. Proceedings of the International Conference on Informatics in School: Situation, Evaluation and Perspectives, November 16-18, 2020, Tallinn, Estonia.

Link: http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-2755/paper6.pdf

Design, Complexity, and Coding: A Framework to Evaluate Games

Bernadette Spieler1 and Ferenc Kemeny2
1University of Hildesheim, Institute for Mathematics and Applied Informatics, Germany
2Institute for Psychology, University of Graz, Austria
bernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de
ferenc.kemeny@uni-graz.at
DOI: 10.34190/GBL.20.156

Abstract: Game development-based learning and creative coding activities are seen as an opportunity for young people to acquire programming skills and overall, Computational Thinking (CT) skills in an entertaining way. The goal of such activities is to create playable gaming artefacts. While learning to code is becoming more and more important, young game design-ers miss a clear map to know how game and design elements can be organized and in which situations, specific elements or structures are appropriate.

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[GERMAN] Das PECC-Framework: Gender-Sensibilität und spielerische Programmierung in der informatischen Grundbildung

Bernadette Spieler 1,2 Carina Girvan3

Universität Hildesheim, Abteilung für Informatik Didaktik, Universitätsplatz 1, 31141 Hildesheim, Deutschland, bernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de, https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2738-019X
2 Technische Universität Graz, Institut für Softwaretechnologie, Rechbauerstraße 12, 8010 Graz, Österreich
3 Cardiff University, School of Social Sciences, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff , CF10 3WT, UK, girvanc@cardiff.ac.uk

Abstract: Mädchen und Frauen sind Vorreiter in der Technologieanwendung, wie zum Beispiel in Bezug auf Smartphones oder Apps. Sie sind aber nur unwesentlich an der Technologieentwicklung beteiligt. Die Jobs der Zukunft sind weitreichend digital und vernetzt und die Nachfrage nach Arbeitskräften mit “Computational Thinking Skills” steigt stetig. Mit einem Fokus auf gendersensible Lehre und Spieldesign können vor allem Mädchen für diese Bereiche motiviert und interessiert werden. Dieser Artikel beschreibt den Einsatz eines geschlechtersensiblen pädagogischen Frameworks für die Informatische Grundbildung. Das “Playing, Engagement, Creativity, Creation” (PECC) Framework wurde durch zentrale Forschungen in den Bereichen Gender Studies, Informatik-Didaktik und von Lerntheorien beeinflusst und iterativ im Zuge einer groß angelegten europäischen Studie entwickelt. In der vorliegenden experimentellen Studie wurde dieser Ansatz mit 12 Schüler und Schülerinnen im regulären Informatikunterricht erprobt und Beobachtung anhand einer qualitativen Inhaltsanalyse beschrieben und mit aktueller Literatur verknüpft.

Continue reading “[GERMAN] Das PECC-Framework: Gender-Sensibilität und spielerische Programmierung in der informatischen Grundbildung”

Bridging the Gap: A Computer Science Pre-MOOC for First Semester Students

Bernadette Spieler1, Maria Grandl2, Martin Ebner2 and Wolfgang Slany31University of Hildesheim, Institute for Mathematics and Applied Informatics, Hildesheim, Germany
2Graz University of Technology, Institute of Interactive Systems and Data Science, Graz, Austria
3Graz University of Technology, Department Educational Technology, Graz, Austria
bernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de
maria.grandl@tugraz.at
martin.ebner@tugraz.at
wolfgang.slany@tugraz.at
DOI: 10.34190/EJEL.20.18.3.004

Abstract: Knowledge in Computer Science (CS) is essential, and companies have increased their demands for CS professionals. Despite this, many jobs remain vacant. Furthermore, computational thinking (CT) skills are required in all contexts of problem solving. A further serious problem arises from the gender disparity in technology related fields.


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“RemoteMentor”: Evaluation of interactions between teenage girls, remote tutors, and coding activities in school lessons

Bernadette Spieler1, Jana Mikats2, Sophi Valentin2, Libora Oates-Indruchova2,
and Wolfgang Slany3
1 University of Hildesheim, Institute of Mathematics and Applied Informatics,
Germany bernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de
2 University of Graz, Institute of Sociology, Austria jana.mikats@uni-graz.at
sophi.valentin@outlook.com
libora.oates-indruchova@uni-graz.at
3 University of Graz, Institue of Software Technology, Austria
wolfgang.slany@tugraz.at

Abstract. Research points at various factors for the low and even decreasing proportion of women in the IT sector in developed countries, e.g., psychological causes, social factors, or structural conditions. These possible explanations all have one thing in common: they recognize adolescence as the essential con dence-building phase in girls. Girls aged 12 to 15 years old seem to lose interest in computer science (CS). Providing mentors and female role models are two key elements to counteract gender stereotypes in CS.

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Reducing Cognitive Load through the Worked Example Effect within a Serious Game Environment

Bernadette Spieler1, Naomi Pfaff2, and Wolfgang Slany2
1 University of Hildesheim, Institute of Mathematics and Applied Informatics,
Germany bernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de
2 University of Graz, Institue of Software Technology, Austria
wolfgang.slany@tugraz.at

Abstract—Novices often struggle to represent problems mentally; the unfamiliar process can exhaust their cognitive resources, creating frustration that deters them from learning. By improving novices’ mental representation of problems, worked
examples improve both problem-solving skills and transfer performance. Programming requires both skills. In programming, it is not sufficient to simply understand how Stackoverflow examples work; programmers have to be able to adapt the principles and apply them to their own programs. This paper shows evidence in support of the theory that worked examples are the most efficient mode of instruction for novices.

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The Magic Word: A Coding Tutorial-Game to Engage Female Teenagers in App Design

[PREPRINT]

Bernadette Spielerbernadette.spieler@uni-hildesheim.de
Institute for Mathematics and Applied Informatics, University of Hildesheim, Hildesheim, Germany
Naomi Pfaffpfaff@student.tugraz.at
Institute of Software Technology, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria
Stefania Makrygiannakiit164703@it.teithe.gr
International Hellenic University, Nea Moudania, Greece
Wolfgang Slanyslany@tugraz.at
Institute of Software Technology, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria

Abstract: Educational games are commonly used to motivate students and provide enhanced learning opportunities. Apps and mobile games play an increasingly important role in education and smartphones are part of the daily lives of most female teenagers: Half of mobile gamers are women and 64% of women prefer smartphones to other platforms. However, gender differences in playing behaviour and preferences raises concerns about potential gender inequalities when games are developed for education.

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[GERMAN] Kreative Aktivitäten mit Smartphones für einen fächerintegrativen Einsatz

Einzelvortrag

Bernadette Spieler1, Vesna Krnjic2
1 Universität Hildesheim, Institut für Mathematik & Angewandte Informatik, Abteilung Informatik-Didaktik
2 Technische Universität Graz, Institut für Softwaretechnologie; spieler@uni-hildesheim.de

Themen: Sekundar I, Digitalisierung & Mathematik, Geometrie, interdisziplinär, MINT
Stichworte: Visuelle Programmierung, Kreativität, Coding, Smartphone, Gender,  Kreative Aktivitäten mit Smartphones für einen fächerintegrativen Einsatz

Kurzfassung: Mit der Lernapp Pocket Code können Schüler/innen zw. 10-17 einfach Programmieren lernen, indem sie kreative Designs entwickeln. Mit grafischen Blöcken und ohne großes Vorwissen, können schnell Anwendungen erstellt werden. Mit einer programmierbaren Stickmaschine werden diese selbst kreierte geometrische Muster dann auf T-Shirts oder Taschen gestickt. Die Stickmuster werden zuerst am Smartphone programmiert und via USB Stick auf die Maschine geladen. Als Resultat haben Schüler/innen etwas Bleibendes zum Anziehen, das sie anderen zeigen können.

Link: https://2020.gdm-tagung.de/
GDM2020 Tagung: 09. – 13.03.2020